PRESS

Concertclassic – Gaelle Le Dantec – August 2019

“Célia Oneto Bensaid boldly launches her “American Touches”, an American program (Gershwin/Bernstein) of a first notable recording released last fall[…], the transcriptions command admiration – and Célia Oneto Bensaid visibly puts it there many […]of gershwin’s Three Preludes are sensitive miniatures that she has beautifully defended, as are Bernstein’s Touches, which inspired the title of her album and concert
.” Read more


Bachtrack – Jean Landras – April 2019

“Burning heart, cold head” liked to say the pianist Heinrich Neuhaus. This is a maxim that the evening artist could make his own. Benefiting from the good sound of the place and the instrument, Célia Oneto-Bensaid revealed her double talent: a daring creator of shimmering piano transcriptions of works of deeply orchestral essence and a performer with astonishing expressivenes
s.” Read more


France Music – Clement Rochefort – March 2019

Generations France Music, liveL
isten to the show


Classicagenda – Frederic Hutman – November 2018

“The great uncles of America of Celia Oneto Bensai
d.” Read more


On Mag – Jean Pierre Robert – November 2018

“Celia Oneto Bensaid plays these pieces with as much conviction and zest as she moves in the art of transcriptio
n” Read more


ENA Review Outside the Walls – November 2018

“After I got rhythm by pianist David Lively, Célia Oneto Bensaid also decided to honour two great American composers. Indeed, for her first recording, this young pianist, with an eloquent record, offers us works by Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990) and George Gershwin (1898-1937). However, if she performs pieces written for the piano, she does not hesitate, through transcriptions, to transport us in the universe of West Side Story or An American in Paris. The challenge is great, as these works combine orchestral colors and percussion power.

Thus, the West Side Story Symphonic Dances bring us back, to our delight, some of the great themes of the musical. From prologue to final, no less than nine musical moments decline the different feelings of the original work. With its ruptures, its degingandairair, its contrasts and its accompaniment in pumps, this transcription of the Prologue places particular emphasis on its influence of ragtime. As for the whistle calls and snapping fingers, which could pass for anecdotal, they create as much surprise as the restitution of the hectic life that runs through Bernstein’s work. In the same vein, the unbridled Mambo is enamelled with “Mambo” proclaimed with energy by Celia Oneto Bensaid, firming the piano stops. Moreover, the Cha-cha introduces on tiptoe the theme of Maria before fading in front of a piano ginning its notes with delicacy. Timeless moment that this one, filled with the grace of subtle and refined harmonies! Finally, Somewhere offers a symphonic piano deploying the silk of his arpeggios. Here, the performer plays on multiple sound planes with surprising fluidity.

Symphonic is also the work of Gershwin An American in Paris. In this respect, legato and pedal give the illusion of hearing strings. The brilliance of the brass is achieved by a staccato of remarkable precision. The ensemble is mixed with rubato and an unspeakable “swing” that radiates all musical discourse with sensitivity and majesty? Moreover, Célia Oneto Bensaid plays masterfully on the ridge line between music of the piano “tapers” of saloons and the refined elegance of salon virtuosos? Moreover, as a metaphor for this double ancestry between scholarly and popular music, our talented pianist includes in his program Three Preludes by Gershwin and Touches by Bernstein, a set of pieces whose elaborate language is not without recall Debussy or Ravel. That’s probably the American touches!”


Le Figaro – Benjamin Puech – October 2018

“Celia Oneto-Bensaïd performs electrifying pieces of West Side Story transcribed by her. And convinces us that there is indeed something sacred that is transmitted in classical music. The audience gets carried away by the tunes of the rogue Manhattan of the 1960s composed by Leonard Bernstein. A mother stifles her son’s cry, determined to show his enthusiasm, too. Anyway, it’s a warm evening.”
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Mediapart – Frederick Casadesus – September 2018

“To music lovers in France, Navarre and the universe, we can’t help but recommend American Touches, a pretty cool record, combining Gershwin and Bernstein, a great success published on the label Sigh Editions. Let it be said, Miss Oneto Bensaïd is at the dawn of a very nice course
.” Read more


Concertonet – Simon Corley – August 2018

“After the brief intermission, it is precisely Bernstein composer who finds, with the Overture of his Candide (1956) transcribed quite stunningly by Célia Oneto Bensaid. “
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Bachtrack – Julien Hanck – November 2017

“Celia Oneto Bensaïd deftly pulls out all the stops in the Quintet. Endurance and control are the key word of his performance. The young pianist does not hesitate to bring out some sharp edges out of her phrasing, while showing a remarkable stylistic homogeneity. “
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Zibeline – Jacques Freschel – August 2017

“The trio (Bertrand Laude, clarinet, Manuel Vioque-Judde, viola, Célia Oneto Bensaid, piano) presented a formation emerging from the traditional violin/cello/piano. With artistic personalities with an obvious aura, it is the musical ensemble that will have most marked the spirits with Pieces for viola, clarinet and piano op.83 by Max Bruch: clarinet of rare sensitivity, princely viola (in the future assured!) and the beautiful guaranteeing the necessary cement for these rich and complementary timbre
s.” Read more


Progress – 2017

“It was a new event relocated as part of the Summer of the Building. On Tuesday, the two musicians Elsa Moatti (violin) and Célia Oneto Bensaid (piano) made a stop at the priory of Pommiers, a place full of history, both atypical and picturesque. The stones were aneed on their clothes of light for this talented duo who offered a melancholy, poetic (sometimes dark) and intimate atmosphere.”


Zibeline – Jacques Freschel – August 2017

“The trio (Bertrand Laude, clarinet, Manuel Vioque-Judde, viola, Célia Oneto Bensaid, piano) presented a formation emerging from the traditional violin/cello/piano. With artistic personalities with an obvious aura, it is the musical ensemble that will have most marked the spirits with Pieces for viola, clarinet and piano op.83 by Max Bruch: clarinet of rare sensitivity, princely viola (in the future assured!) and the beautiful guaranteeing the necessary cement for these rich and complementary timbre
s.” Read more


Culturebox – 2016

“She is an orchestra in her own righ
t” Read more